HOSA
Parliamentary Procedure
Official Reference
Robert, Henry M. II and William J. Evans.  Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised.
Scott, Foresman and Company.

What is Parliamentary Procedure?
Parliamentary procedure is a set of rules to help groups achieve their objectives.
The “rules” are a code of ethics that relate to the conduct of meetings.
Parliamentary procedure is founded on democratic principles.
It teaches concepts of teamwork.
It helps us transact business quickly, efficiently, and in keeping with the will of the majority.

Basic Rules of Parliamentary Procedure
Use parliamentary procedure to protect the rights of ALL members - particularly their right to be heard, to be treated fairly, and to be treated with respect.
Never use your knowledge of Parliamentary Procedure to control and intimidate members of your group.  Your ability to think and act with compassion should guide your meetings, NOT your knowledge of formal rules.
The presiding officer’s station is called “the chair.”  Members address only the chair, usually as Mr. President or Madam President.
A member must “obtain the floor” by being “recognized” before speaking.  Generally, the member rises to speak and sits to yield the floor.
Members are not entitled to the floor a second time in debate on the same motion as long as any other member who has not spoken on this motion wishes to debate.

Principles of Parliamentary Procedure
Every member is entitled to free and full debate on issues that relate to the group.
Every member had rights equal to every other member.
The business and discussion should follow good rules of courtesy.
The rules of the group apply to all members.  When everyone follows the same principles of conducting a meeting, everyone has a fair and equal opportunity to voice their opinion and participate like an active member of a team.
Parliamentary law was designed to be used for groups that are free agents - free to do what they want to do with greatest amount of protection for and consideration of the rights of the members.

How do you make a motion?
Three steps are needed to bring a motion to the floor:
1) A member makes a motion.
2) The motion is seconded.
3) The chair states the motion (question.)
When all three steps happen, the motion is pending.
A motion requires a second to be considered, unless the motion is made on behalf of a committee.
If the motion is NOT seconded, it is lost for lack of a second.
To second a motion means that another member (not the maker of the motion) believes the motion should be discussed.
A member who wishes to second a motion should say “I second the motion” or “Second” - without waiting to be recognized.

The Order of Business
The presiding officer determines that a quorum is present and then calls the meeting to order by standing and clearly stating “The meeting will come to order.”
The standard order for business meetings is as follows:
CALL TO ORDER
OPENING CEREMONY (Optional)
READING AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES
President “The secretary will read the minutes of our last meeting.”
Secretary Reads the minutes.
President “Are there any corrections or additions to the minutes?  If not, the minutes will stand approved as read.”
TREASURER’S REPORT
President “The treasurer will present his/her report.”
Treasurer Gives the report.
President “Are there any questions?  If not, the treasurer’s report will be filed for audit.”

The Order of Business (Continued)
STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEE REPORTS
President “Are there any committee reports?” or “The ____________ committee will present their report.”
Committee Usually the committee chairman reads  the report.  If a motion is made by the committee, it must be adopted by the assembly.  Committee motions do NOT require a second.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
President Announces any unfinished business that was pending/postponed from the previous meeting.  The chair does NOT ask for unfinished business, but rather, states the question on the item to be placed on the floor.
NEW BUSINESS
PROGRAM  (Optional)
Speaker, film, etc.  May come before the business part of the meeting if necessary.
ADJOURN

Committee Reports
A committee is a small number of persons appointed to give a task more detailed attention.
STANDING COMMITTEES perform a continuing function and remain in existence permanently.
SPECIAL COMMITTEES are appointed to carry out a specific task.
Committees are appointed by:
Election by ballot
Open nominations
Nominations by the chair
Appointments by the chair
Sample Program Committee Report
The program committee is pleased to report that our special guest speaker for our next meeting will be Dr. Jim Koeninger, Executive Director of National HOSA, whose topic will be “Leadership 2000.”

The Main Motion
The main motion brings business before the assembly and/or introduces a new subject.  This motion can only be made when no other business is pending.
President “Is there any new business to come before this meeting?”
Member #1 Seeks recognition
President Recognizes member
Member #1 “I move that _________________”
Member #2 “Second.”  If none, the president should ask “Is there a second?”
President “A motion has been made and seconded that (repeats motion made by member #1).  Is there any discussion?
Member #1 Seeks recognition - debates motion if  desired
President “Is there any further discussion? (No answer.)  “If not, are you ready for  the question?”  (Still no answer.)  “All those in favor of (read the motion if  members need to be reminded) say aye.”  (Pause)  All opposed say no.”  (pause)  The ayes (or noes) have it, the motion carries (fails.)  We will (or will not) _________.

Subsidiary Motions
Subsidiary motions assist the group in treating or disposing of a main motion, and sometimes other motions.
Subsidiary motions have rank, which means that one subsidiary motion can be made while another subsidiary motion is pending, if it has higher rank.
Rank order
Lay on the Table
Previous Question
Limit or Extend Limits of Debate
Postpone to Certain Time
Commit or Refer
Amend
Postpone Indefinitely

Subsidiary Motions:
Postpone Indefinitely
PURPOSE - It gets rid of the main motion for the duration of the session without actually defeating the motion.  It is used when adopting or rejecting the main motion would have negative consequences.
MAY INTERRUPT: No
SECOND: Yes
DEBATABLE: Yes
AMENDABLE: No
VOTE NEEDED: Majority
EXAMPLE:
Member A “I move that the motion to buy lunch for all senior HOSA members be postponed indefinitely.”  (Second)
President “It is moved and seconded that the motion to buy lunch for all senior HOSA  members be postponed indefinitely.  The chair recognizes Member A. “
NOTE:  Debate can go into the merits of the main motion.  When debate ceases, the motion to postpone indefinitely is voted on first.

Subsidiary Motions:
Amend
PURPOSE - To modify the wording of the pending motion before it is acted upon.
MAY INTERRUPT: No
SECOND: Yes
DEBATABLE: Yes  (when the motion it is applied to is debatable.)
AMENDABLE: Yes  (if so, the first amend is the primary amendment, and the next is the secondary amendment.  The secondary amendment is NOT amendable.)
VOTE NEEDED: Majority
EXAMPLE:
Member A “I move to amend by striking out lunch and inserting breakfast.”  (Second)
President It is moved and seconded to strike out the word “lunch” and insert the word “breakfast.”  If the motion is adopted, it will read that we buy breakfast for all senior HOSA members. The question is on the amendment to strike out lunch and insert breakfast.

Subsidiary Motions:
Amend  (continued)
NOTE:  The proposed amendment must be germane - which means it must in some way relate to the motion to which it is applied.
EXAMPLE OF A SECONDARY AMENDMENT:
Member B “I move to amend the pending amendment by inserting the words “at the Biscuit Hut” after “breakfast.”  (Second)
President It is moved and seconded to amend by  inserting in the primary amendment the words “at the Biscuit Hut” after “breakfast.”  If the words are inserted, the primary amendment will be to “strike out  lunch and insert breakfast at the Biscuit Hut.” The question is on inserting the words “at the Biscuit Hut.”
NOTE:  For the secondary amendment, debate must be confined to the issue - in this case, “the Biscuit Hut”.
Remember that only one motion is pending at a time.  Adoption of an amendment changes the motion it proposed to amend, but does NOT adopt or fail the original motion.

Subsidiary Motions:
Commit or Refer
PURPOSE - It is used to send a pending question to a committee in order to more carefully consider the question.
MAY INTERRUPT: No
SECOND: Yes
DEBATABLE: Yes  (to discuss the merits of sending the motion to a committee.)
AMENDABLE:  Yes  (under certain conditions)
VOTE NEEDED: Majority
EXAMPLE:
Member A “I move to refer this motion to the Social Committee.”  (Second)
President “It is moved and seconded that the motion to buy lunch for all senior HOSA  members be referred to the Social Committee.  Is there any discussion on  the motion to refer?”
NOTE:  The example above is to refer to a standing committee.  If the maker of the motion wanted a special committee established, the motion might have been stated “I move to refer this motion to a committee to be appointed by the president."

Subsidiary Motions:
Postpone to a Certain Time (OR Definitely)
PURPOSE - It is to postpone action on a pending question until a specified time.
MAY INTERRUPT: No
SECOND: Yes
DEBATABLE: Yes  (to discuss the merits of postponement.)
AMENDABLE:  Yes  (as to the time to postpone to.)
VOTE NEEDED: Majority
EXAMPLE:
Member A “I move to postpone the motion to our next meeting.”  (Second)
President “It is moved and seconded that the motion to buy lunch for all senior HOSA members be postponed until our next meeting.  Is there any discussion on the motion to postpone?”

Subsidiary Motions:
Limit or Extend Limits of Debate
PURPOSE - It allows a group to exercise control over debate on a pending motion.  The motion can reduce the number or length of speeches permitted, or allow more or longer speeches.
MAY INTERRUPT: No
SECOND: Yes
DEBATABLE: No
AMENDABLE:  Yes  (and the amendment is NOT debatable.)
VOTE NEEDED: 2/3 vote
EXAMPLE:
Member A “I move that debate on the pending motion be limited to 10 minutes.”  (Second)
President “It is moved and seconded that debate on the the motion to buy lunch for all senior HOSA members be limited to 10 minutes.  This motion is not debatable but it can be amended.  Are you ready for the question?”

Subsidiary Motions:
Previous Question
PURPOSE - It immediately closes debate and brings to vote one or more pending motions.
MAY INTERRUPT: No
SECOND: Yes
DEBATABLE: No
AMENDABLE:  No
VOTE NEEDED: 2/3 vote
EXAMPLE:
Member A “I move the previous question.”  (Second)
President “The previous question is moved.  As many as are in favor of the previous question on the motion to buy lunch for all senior HOSA members rise. . .be seated.  All opposed, rise. . .be seated.  There are two thirds in the affirmative and the previous question is ordered on  the motion to buy lunch for all senior HOSA members.  All those in favor of  buying lunch for all senior HOSA members say aye, etc.”  OR  “There are less than 2/3 in the affirmative and the motion for the previous question is lost.  The question is now on (the pending motion.)”

Subsidiary Motions:
Previous Question - Other Forms   of the Motion
The rules for the Previous Question apply, regardless of the form used.
For example, the motions “I call for the question” or “Question” or “I move we vote now” are all forms of the Previous Question.
Sometimes, this particular rule is misunderstood, which can violate a member’s right to debate.  Only a 2/3 vote can close debate.
When a member says “I call for the question.”, the chair may ask if there is any objection to closing debate.   If there is no objection, it is appropriate to proceed with the vote.  If a member objects, then it is acceptable to ask for a second to the motion to order the Previous Question, and proceed appropriately.

Subsidiary Motions:
Comments
OTHER SUBSIDIARY MOTIONS:
4  Lay on the Table
The motion descriptions given are designed to help familiarize the new learner with basic parliamentary procedure.  To learn more about each type of motion, it is important to have a copy of Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised, available when conducting a meeting.
In addition, a variety of learning materials are available from the National Association of Parliamentarians.
Note:  The preceding motions are only “subsidiary” if properly made when another motion is pending.

Privileged Motions
Privileged motions do not relate to the pending motion.  They relate to special materials of particular importance, and should be allowed to interrupt the consideration of other matters.
Like subsidiary motions, they have an order of precedence or rank.
Rank order
Fix the Time to Which to Adjourn
Adjourn
Recess
Raise a Question of Privilege
Commit or Refer
Call for the Orders
of the Day

Privileged Motions:
Raise a Question of Privilege
PURPOSE - It permits a request relating to the rights of the group or its members to be brought up for possible immediately consideration.
MAY INTERRUPT: Yes (when appropriate.)
SECOND: No
DEBATABLE: No
AMENDABLE:  No
VOTE NEEDED: None.  It is ruled on by the chair.
TYPES:  Questions of privilege 1) That relate to the assembly, or 2) Personal privilege.

Privileged Motions:
Raise a Question of Privilege
(continued)
EXAMPLE (Relating to the Assembly):
Member A “Mr./Madam President.  I rise to a question of privilege affecting the assembly.”
President “The member will state her question.”
Member A “It is difficult for those of us in the back of the room to hear the speaker.  Could she please use the microphone?”
President (To the speaker.)  “Would you please use the microphone.  Thank you.”
EXAMPLE (Relating to personal privilege):
Member A “Mr./Madam President.  I rise to a question of personal privilege.”
President “The member will state her question.”
Member A “I cannot hear in the back of the room.   May I move my chair closer to the front?’
President “Yes you may.”
Note:  The motion allows one to “raise” the point, but it is up to the chair to determine if the point is appropriate, and how to proceed.  Sometimes, that means allowing a motion, taking care of the concern immediately, or ruling otherwise.

Privileged Motions:
Recess
PURPOSE - It provides a short intermission that begins immediately after being passed.  It is only “privileged” if made when another motion is pending.  When the recess is over, business is taken up exactly where it left off.
MAY INTERRUPT: No
SECOND: Yes
DEBATABLE: No
AMENDABLE:  Yes (as to the length)
VOTE NEEDED: Majority
EXAMPLE:
Member A “Mr./Madam President.  I move that the meeting recess for 5 minutes.”  (Second)
President “A motion has been made that we take a 5 minute recess.  All those in favor say  aye.  All opposed say no.  The ayes have it and the meeting stands recessed for 5 minutes.” (rapping once with gavel, if  desired.)

Privileged Motions:
Adjourn
PURPOSE - It closes a meeting immediately.
Note:  It is only a privileged motion if there is already another meeting scheduled, and no time for adjourning has already been set.  It does not matter if a question is pending or not.
MAY INTERRUPT: No
SECOND: Yes
DEBATABLE: No
AMENDABLE:  NO
VOTE NEEDED: Majority
EXAMPLE:
Member A “Mr./Madam President.  I move to adjourn.”  (Second)
President “It is moved an seconded to adjourn.  As many as are in favor, say aye, etc.”
Note:  The chair can suggest adjournment by unanimous consent if there seems to be a general desire to adjourn.  One tap of the gavel may signal adjournment.

Privileged Motions:
Comments
OTHER PRIVILEGED MOTIONS:                                    4  Call for the Orders of the Day                                           4  Fix Time to Which to adjourn

Incidental Motions
Incidental motions deal with questions of procedure arising out of another pending motion, or sometimes another item of business.
Most are undebatable and must be decided immediately.

Incidental Motions:
Point of Order
PURPOSE - It is used when a member thinks the rules of the assembly are being violated.  When a member makes a “point of order”, the chair must make a ruling.
MAY INTERRUPT: Yes
SECOND: No
DEBATABLE: No  (But with the chair’s consent, the member raising the point may explain his/her position.)
AMENDABLE:  No
VOTE NEEDED: None.  It is ruled on by the chair.
EXAMPLE:
Member A (Without waiting to be recognized.) “Point of Order.”
President “State your point.”
Member A “There was no second to the motion just made.”
President “You are correct.  Is there a second to the motion that. .  .?”

Incidental Motions:
Division of the Assembly
PURPOSE - It is used when a member doubts the results of a voice vote or show of hands, thereby requiring that the vote be taken again by rising.
MAY INTERRUPT: Yes
SECOND: No
DEBATABLE: No
AMENDABLE:  No
VOTE NEEDED: None.
EXAMPLE:
President “The ayes have it, the motion carries.”
Member A (Without waiting to be recognized.) “Division!”
President “A division has been called.  All those in favor of ______ please stand.  Thank you.  All opposed please stand.  Thank you.  The affirmative has it and ....”

Incidental Motions:
Requests and Inquiries
PURPOSE - In connection with a meeting, members may wish to ask a question or have something done that requires the permission of the assembly.  Two types of questions include:   1) Parliamentary inquiry and            2) Point of Information
MAY INTERRUPT: Yes  (if necessary)
SECOND: No
DEBATABLE: No
AMENDABLE:  No
VOTE NEEDED: None.
EXAMPLE:
Member A (Without waiting to be recognized.) “Madam President, I rise to a parliamentary inquiry.”
President “The member will state the inquiry.”
Member A “Is it in order to move the previous question?”

Incidental Motions:
Comments
OTHER INCIDENTAL MOTIONS:                                  4  Appeal                                                                4  Suspend the Rules                 4  Object to the Consideration of a Question    4  Division of a Question                 4  Consideration by Paragraph or Seriatim    4  Motions related to methods of voting and the polls    4  Motions relating to Nominations


Motions That Bring a Question Again Before the Assembly
These motions allow an assembly to reopen a completed question or take up one that has been temporarily disposed of.
MOTIONS THAT BRING A QUESTION AGAIN BEFORE THE ASSEMBLY are:              4  Take from the Table                                          4  Rescind or Amend Something Previously Adopted       4  Discharge a Committee                    4  Reconsider
The details on the purpose and form of these motions can be obtained from Robert’s Rules of Order, New Revised.


Sample Treasurer’s Report
Smithtown HOSA Treasurer’s Report
For the year ending June 30, 1999
Balance on hand, July 1, 1998       $1253.25
Receipts
  Dues $200                             Car Wash $900
Total Receipts $1100
Disbursements
  NLC $1200 •  Plaques $100
Total Disbursements $1300
Balance on hand, July 1, 1999 $1053.25


Sample Minutes
The regular monthly meeting of Smithtown Technical College HOSA was held on Thursday, July 15, 1999 at the Holiday Inn in Smithtown, the president being in the chair and the secretary being present. Roll was taken and a quorum was present. The minutes of the last meeting were approved as read.
The treasurer’s report was presented and filed for audit.
Karen, reporting on behalf of the membership committee, reported that all state HOSA chapters are projecting membership increases this year.
Dennis moved that STC HOSA sponsor a fundraising project for the Make-a-Wish Foundation.  The motion carried.  The president asked the fundraising committee to consider fundraising options and bring a report to the next meeting.
The president introduced the guest speaker, Dr. Jim Koeninger, whose topic was “Leadership 2000.”
The meeting adjourned at 6:00 pm.
Jeff Jason
Secretary


Notes about the Minutes
The minutes should contain an introductory paragraph.
The body of the paragraph contains a separate paragraph for each subject matter.
The name of the mover is included with important motions.  The name of the person who seconds the motion DOES NOT need to be given.
The name of a guest speaker can be given, but no effort should be made to summarize the speaker’s remarks.
The last paragraph should contain the hour of adjournment.
Minutes should be signed by the secretary.  The words “respectfully  submitted” are not necessary.
The minutes are normally read and approved at the beginning of the next meeting.
Corrections, if any, and approval of the minutes are usually done by unanimous consent.


Notes about the Gavel and a Few Other Points
Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised, does not address the use of the gavel when calling a meeting to order.
The gavel can be used to signify adjournment with one tap of the gavel.
The president must determine if a quorum is present before calling the meeting to order.
The Call to Order may be immediately followed by patriotic exercises or another opening ceremony.
Members may address only the presiding officer, or may address others through the presiding officer.
The presiding officer must remain impartial.
Before a vote, the presiding officer may ask “Are you ready for the question?” as a last call before voting.
The presiding officer may vote to make or break a tie.


Closing Thoughts. . .
Parliamentary Procedure can be a useful tool for the HOSA chapter - and for the individual who learns the skills to participate in a group.  The application of Parliamentary skills can be simple - or very complex, depending up the desires of the group.
The HOSA Parliamentary Procedure competitive event develops leadership skills, thinking skills, speaking skills and sense of camaraderie among team members.  While a great deal of hard work, study and practice is required for national success, the long term benefits are. . .priceless!