Your 4-Step Officer Team Succession Plan

The idea of moving on and passing the HOSA torch is an unpleasant thought. Understandably, many teams put it off. Without a plan, officer teams miss out on being able to ensure chapter continuity and future direction. Where do you start? Whether you are a state or a local officer team, the following steps will ease the stress of transition and jump-start the new team.
1.  Evaluate your resources.
It woud be a shame to create or purchase an item for you and future teams but never communicate that it's available. Keep a log of the tools, booklets, signs, supplies, etc. that future teams may take advantage of. 
2.  Analyze and record what your function in the organization is and the value that you create as officers. 
Write down each positions' job description. Not what it says in the book, but what and how your chapter or team actually functions. Think about what you spend your time doing and what do you do particularly well. Consider having each officer writing a letter to his or her successor that provides helpful strategies. Often times officer candidates ask, "How much time is required?" A timeline of events will provide a great illustration and a clear answer to ease their concern. 
3.  Pass along the chapter or state officer team activity notebook.
If you did not make an Outstanding HOSA Chapter Scrapbook, the Recognition Event may be a great resource for future teams. Make a list of all the activities your team facilitated throughout the year, a timeline, and a copy of your meeting minutes. The more details you include, the more helpful it will be. Be honest with your information. Share how much time you spent planning for each activity. Communicate if the event was a success or failure and how you would do it differently, if at all, given a second opportunity. Provide helpful hints that will serve next year's members well.
4.  Start recruiting next year's team.
If you recognize a person that you think might make a good officer, let them know. Simply encourage that person by saying, "I think you'd make a great HOSA officer. Have you considered running for office?" These simple words might change someone's life forever.  

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